What's Current?

Postictal immobility and generalized EEG suppression are associated with the severity of respiratory dysfunction

Epilepsia - Thu, 01/14/2016 - 06:07
Summary Objective

The pathophysiology of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) remains undetermined. Seizures are accompanied by respiratory dysfunction (RD). Postictal generalized electroencephalography (EEG) suppression (PGES) may follow generalized tonic–clonic seizures (GTCS). Following GTCS patients have impaired arousal and may be motionless. Patients with SUDEP are usually prone. Postictal immobility (PI) may contribute to SUDEP by not permitting repositioning of the head to allow unimpeded ventilation. To determine whether RD and/or ictal characteristics are associated with PI, we analyzed patients with GTCS in the epilepsy monitoring unit.

Method

We investigated for associations between PI duration and PGES, ictal/postictal oxygen saturation (SpO2), end-tidal CO2 (ETCO2), seizure localization, duration, and tonic and total convulsive phase duration. We investigated for linkage between PGES and these measures.

Results

Seventy patients with 181 GTCS and available SpO2 and/or ETCO2 data were studied. Simple linear regression analysis by seizures showed that PI duration was associated with peak periictal ETCO2 (p = 0.03), duration of oxygen desaturation (p = 0.005) and with SpO2 nadir (p = 0.02). PI duration was not associated with tonic, convulsive phase or total seizure duration. Analysis by patients also showed significant association of PI with RD. Duration of PI was longer following seizures with PGES (p < 0.001). PGES was not associated with the tonic, convulsive phase or total seizure duration. SpO2 nadir was lower in seizures with PGES (p = 0.046), ETCO2 peak change (p = 0.003) was higher, and duration of ETCO2 elevation (p = 0.03) was longer. Multivariable regression analysis showed that PGES and severe RD were associated with PI duration.

Significance

The duration of PI and presence of PGES are associated with periictal RD. The duration of PI is also associated with the presence of PGES. Seizure duration or duration of the convulsive phase is not associated with PI or PGES. Interventions aimed at reversing impaired arousal and PI may reduce SUDEP risk.

Categories: What's Current?

What factors contribute to the risk of depression in epilepsy?—Tasmanian Epilepsy Register Mood Study (TERMS)

Epilepsia - Thu, 01/14/2016 - 01:02
Summary Objective

To model the factors associated with depression in a community sample of people with epilepsy. The factors investigated were derived from proposed risk factors for depression from patients with epilepsy, other chronic illness, and the general population.

Methods

Multivariate analysis using general linear regression models of factors associated with depression in the Tasmanian Epilepsy Register Mood Study (TERMS), a cross-sectional community sample of 440 patients with epilepsy.

Results

A model with acceptable fit was created that explained 66% of the variance of depression. Associated factors included in this model were neuroticism, physical functioning, social support, past history of depression, and stressful life events.

Significance

In this cross-sectional study designed specifically to investigate depression in epilepsy, we showed that general risk factors for depression in other illness and in the general population are also important in patients with epilepsy, with little support for disease-related risk factors.

Categories: What's Current?

PCDH19-related epilepsy in two mosaic male patients

Epilepsia - Thu, 01/14/2016 - 00:52
Summary

PCDH19 gene mutations have been recently associated with an epileptic syndrome characterized by focal and generalized seizures. The PCDH19 gene (Xq22.1) has an unusual X-linked inheritance with a selective involvement for female subjects. A cellular interference mechanism has been hypothesized and male patients can manifest epilepsy only in the case of a mosaicism. So far about 100 female patients, and only one symptomatic male have been described. Using targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) approach we found a PCDH19 point mutation in two male patients with a clinical picture suggestive of PCDH19-related epilepsy. The system allowed us to verify that the two c.1352 C>T; p.(Pro451Leu) and c.918C>G; p.(Tyr306*) variants occurred in mosaic status. Mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Up to now, the traditional molecular screening for PCDH19-related epilepsy has been targeted to all females with early onset epilepsy with or without cognitive impairment. Male patients were generally excluded. We describe for the first time two mosaic PCDH19 point mutations in two male patients with a clinical picture suggestive of PCDH19-related epilepsy. This finding opens new opportunities for the molecular diagnoses in patients with a peculiar type of epilepsy that remains undiagnosed in male patients.

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