What's Current?

Five-year extended follow-up status of 10 patients with Dravet syndrome treated with fenfluramine

Epilepsia - Fri, 05/20/2016 - 05:21
Summary

Dravet syndrome (DS) is a rare and therapy-resistant epilepsy syndrome. A retrospective analysis of add-on fenfluramine treatment in 12 patients with DS was published in 2012 and provided evidence of a meaningful long-term response. Herein we present the results of a subsequent 5-year prospective observation of this original cohort. Ten patients with a mean current age of 24 years were followed prospectively from 2010 until 2014. The mean current dose of fenfluramine was 0.27 mg/kg/day, with a mean treatment duration of 16.1 years. Seizure frequency was derived from a seizure diary. Cardiac examinations and assessments of clinical effectiveness and adverse events were performed at least annually. Three patients were seizure-free for the entire 5 years, and an additional four patients experienced seizure-free intervals of at least 2 years. Fenfluramine was generally well-tolerated. Two patients had mild (stable) valve thickening on the last echocardiography that was deemed clinically insignificant. No patient had any clinical or echocardiographic signs of pulmonary hypertension. These findings support the long-term control of convulsive seizures by low-dose fenfluramine while being well tolerated in this cohort of patients with DS. After up to 27 years of treatment, no patient has developed any clinical signs or symptoms of cardiac valvulopathy or pulmonary hypertension.

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Calcium channels team up to activate excitable cells

Medical News Today - Fri, 05/20/2016 - 04:00
Finding contradicts earlier belief that channels do not work cooperatively.Voltage-gated calcium channels open in unison, rather than independently, to allow calcium ions into and activate...
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Drug used for pain, anxiety may be linked to birth defects

Science Daily - Wed, 05/18/2016 - 17:00
A drug commonly used to treat pain, epilepsy, anxiety and other brain health disorders may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, according to a new study.
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Interaction with slow waves during sleep improves discrimination of physiologic and pathologic high-frequency oscillations (80–500 Hz)

Epilepsia - Tue, 05/17/2016 - 03:25
Summary Objective

To characterize the interaction between physiologic and pathologic high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) and slow waves during sleep, and to evaluate the practical significance of these interactions by automatically classifying channels as recording from normal or epileptic brain regions.

Methods

We automatically detected HFOs in intracerebral electroencephalography (EEG) recordings of 45 patients. We characterized the interaction between the HFOs and the amplitude and phase of automatically detected slow waves during sleep. We computed features associated with HFOs, and compared classic features such as rate, amplitude, duration, and frequency to novel features related to the interaction between HFOs and slow waves. To quantify the practical significance of the difference in these features we classified the channels as recording from normal/epileptic regions using logistic regression. We assessed the results in different brain regions to study differences in the HFO characteristics at the lobar level.

Results

We found a clear difference in the coupling between the phase of slow waves during sleep and the occurrence of HFOs. In channels recording physiologic activity, the HFOs tend to occur after the peak of the deactivated state of the slow wave, and in channels with epileptic activity, the HFOs occur more often before this peak. This holds for HFOs in the ripple (80–250 Hz) and fast ripple (250–500 Hz) bands, and different regions of the brain. When using this interaction to automatically classify channels as recording from normal/epileptic brain regions, the performance is better than when using other HFO characteristics. We confirmed differences in the HFO characteristics in mesiotemporal structures and in the occipital lobe.

Significance

We found the association between slow waves and HFOs to be different in normal and epileptic brain regions, emphasizing their different origin. This is also of practical significance, since it improves the separation between channels recording from normal and epileptic brain regions.

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Breast cancer drug found to reduce seizures

Medical News Today - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 03:00
Findings from animal study could lead to improved seizure treatment in humans.
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Involvement of GATOR complex genes in familial focal epilepsies and focal cortical dysplasia

Epilepsia - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 02:55
Summary Objective

The discovery of mutations in DEPDC5 in familial focal epilepsies has introduced a novel pathomechanism to a field so far dominated by ion channelopathies. DEPDC5 is part of a complex named GAP activity toward RAGs (GATOR) complex 1 (GATOR1), together with the proteins NPRL2 and NPRL3, and acts to inhibit the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway. GATOR1 is in turn inhibited by the GATOR2 complex. The mTORC1 pathway is a major signaling cascade regulating cell growth, proliferation, and migration. We aimed to study the contribution of GATOR complex genes to the etiology of focal epilepsies and to describe the associated phenotypical spectrum.

Methods

We performed targeted sequencing of the genes encoding the components of the GATOR1 (DEPDC5, NPRL2, and NPRL3) and GATOR2 (MIOS, SEC13, SEH1L, WDR24, and WDR59) complex in 93 European probands with focal epilepsy with or without focal cortical dysplasia. Phospho-S6 immunoreactivity was used as evidence of mTORC1 pathway activation in resected brain tissue of patients carrying pathogenic variants.

Results

We identified four pathogenic variants in DEPDC5, two in NPRL2, and one in NPRL3. We showed hyperactivation of the mTORC1 pathway in brain tissue from patients with NPRL2 and NPRL3 mutations. Collectively, inactivating mutations in GATOR1 complex genes explained 11% of cases of focal epilepsy, whereas no pathogenic mutations were found in GATOR2 complex genes. GATOR1-related focal epilepsies differ clinically from focal epilepsies due to mutations in ion channel genes by their association with focal cortical dysplasia and seizures emerging from variable foci, and might confer an increased risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP).

Significance

GATOR1 complex gene mutations leading to mTORC1 pathway upregulation is an important cause of focal epilepsy with cortical malformations and represents a potential target for novel therapeutic approaches.

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Falling status epilepticus mortality rates in England and Wales: 2001–2013?

Epilepsia - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 02:55
Summary

Status epilepticus (SE) is associated with significant mortality and accounts for ~10% of epilepsy-related deaths. Epilepsy and SE mortality data from 2001 to 2013, in addition to annual age group populations for England and Wales, were obtained from the Office of National Statistics website (www.ons.gov.uk). Age-adjusted mortality rates for epilepsy and SE with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the European Standard Population. Trends in mortality rates for both epilepsy and SE were investigated using the Spearman coefficient. The crude mean epilepsy mortality rate per 100,000 person-years between 2001 and 2013 was 1.87 (95% CI 1.83–1.91), with a corresponding SE mortality rate of 0.14 (95% CI 0.13–0.15). The mean age-adjusted epilepsy mortality rate per 100,000 person years was 3.24 (95% CI 3.12–3.35), with a corresponding SE mortality rate of 0.24 (95% CI 0.21–0.27). All epilepsy deaths significantly decreased from 2001 to 2013 (Spearman's ρ −0.733, p = 0.004); this decrease was predominantly due to a decrease in SE deaths (Spearman's ρ −0.917, p < 0.001). In summary, our finding supports the hypothesis that the policy of early and aggressive treatment of SE may be improving the prognosis of this condition in England and Wales.

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Different parvalbumin and GABA expression in human epileptogenic focal cortical dysplasia

Epilepsia - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 02:45
Summary Objective

Several studies have reported that inhibitory networks are altered in dysplastic tissue obtained from epilepsy surgery specimens. A consistent decrease in the number of inhibitory interneuronal subpopulation that expresses parvalbumin (PV) was reported in postsurgical tissue from patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). We tested if the decrease in PV protein expression observed in epileptic tissue corresponds to a parallel impairment in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic compartment.

Methods

We analyzed postsurgical tissue from 30 surgically treated patients who underwent surgery for intractable epilepsy including 26 patients with FCD (types I, II, and III) and 4 patients without any microscopic visible lesion (cryptogenic) as controls. Serial sections were processed using in situ hybridization with GAD-65 and GAD-67 probes and immunocytochemistry with antibody against PV. The density of inhibitory PV-immunoreactive interneurons in relation to GABAergic cells was estimated in controls and in all different pathologic groups by using a two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) cell-counting technique. Field fraction and line profile analyses were added to estimate immunostaining proportion and distribution of PV signal generated in gray matter.

Results

A reduction of PV-positive cells and PV-immunoreactivity was observed exclusively in FCD type I/III specimens compared with cryptogenic tissue from control patients with a poor postsurgical outcome. In FCD type II, a profound rearrangement in the cortical distribution of PV immunoreactivity was observed, without a quantitative reduction of the number of neurons and terminals. In situ hybridization did not reveal significant variations of GAD expression in any FCD subtype.

Significance

Our study suggests a preservation of inhibitory networks in FCD postsurgical tissue, demonstrated by a substantial normal count of GABAergic neurons. A selective PV expression impairment is demonstrated in FCD type I and III and an abnormal, but not reduced, distribution of PV cells and terminals is confirmed in type II FCD. Possible functional consequences are discussed.

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Kainic acid–induced albumin leak across the blood–brain barrier facilitates epileptiform hyperexcitability in limbic regions

Epilepsia - Fri, 05/13/2016 - 02:16
Summary Objective

Systemic administration of kainic acid (KA) is a widely used procedure utilized to develop a model of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Despite its ability to induce status epilepticus (SE) in vivo, KA applied to in vitro preparations induces only interictal-like activity and/or isolated ictal discharges. The possibility that extravasation of the serum protein albumin from the vascular compartment enhances KA-induced brain excitability is investigated here.

Methods

Epileptiform activity was induced by arterial perfusion of 6 μm KA in the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain preparation. Simultaneous field potential recordings were carried out bilaterally from limbic (CA1, dentate gyrus [DG], and entorhinal cortex) and extralimbic regions (piriform cortex and neocortex). Blood–brain barrier (BBB) breakdown associated with KA-induced epileptiform activity was assessed by parenchymal leakage of intravascular fluorescein-isothiocyanate albumin. Seizure-induced brain inflammation was evaluated by western blot analysis of interleukin (IL)-1β expression in brain tissue.

Results

KA infusion caused synchronized activity at 15–30 Hz in limbic (but not extralimbic) cortical areas, associated with a brief, single seizure-like event. A second bolus of KA, 60 min after the induction of the first ictal event, did not further enhance excitability. Perfusion of serum albumin between the two administrations of KA enhanced epileptiform discharges and allowed a recurrent ictal event during the second KA infusion.

Significance

Our data show that arterial KA administration selectively alters the synchronization of limbic networks. However, KA is not sufficient to generate recurrent seizures unless serum albumin is co-perfused during KA administration. These findings suggest a role of serum albumin in facilitating acute seizure generation.

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Algorithms that can predict epileptic seizures

Medical News Today - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 11:00
Computer scientists and mathematicians at the CEU Cardenal Herrera University in Valencia have developed a prediction model that can warn epileptic sufferers of an upcoming seizure with 20 minutes...
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Targeted orphaned domain may lead to drug therapies: Research key to possible drug therapies for nervous system diseases and inflammatory processes

Medical News Today - Thu, 05/12/2016 - 06:00
"Pentameric quaternary structure of the intracellular domain of serotonin type 3A receptors," was published in the April issue of Scientific Reports. Along with her research team, Akash Pandhare, Ph.
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Algorithms can predict epileptic seizures

Science Daily - Wed, 05/11/2016 - 08:41
Computer scientists and mathematicians have developed a prediction model that can warn epileptic sufferers of an upcoming seizure with 20 minutes notice.
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